Category: Theory and Methods for Self-Organization

Achieving consensus in networks with disturbances

The problem of finding a consensus in a group of people occurs in many social contexts. In a similar way, distributed algorithms for consensus play an important role in networked computing and communication systems if centralized decision making is difficult or impossible. Each entity in such a system processes only local information obtained from its neighbors and ideally performs only simple computations. Despite this simplicity, the process of consensus building…

Pulse-coupled oscillator synchronization on FPGA radios

The mathematical modeling of pulse-coupled biological oscillators offers a fully decentralized and scalable approach for time synchronization. There is a broad spectrum of work on pulse-coupled oscillators in physics, biology, neuroscience, and other disciplines. The communications engineering community has been interested to transfer these results to the synchronization of nodes in wireless networks. A one-to-one transfer is infeasible due to the differences between wireless and biological communications. Several extensions and…

Research days on self-organizing systems

A full week of discussions, talks, and group work on self-organizing networked systems is the concept of Research Days, organized for the second year by Lakeside Labs from July 13 – 17, 2009. Speakers included the experts Alain Barrat, Francis Heylighen, Hermann de Meer, Raissa D’Souza, and Marc Timme, along with other guests, Lakeside Labs professors, and researchers. Major discussion topics included robustness in self-organizing systems, modeling of self-organizing systems,…